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The IRS has reminded taxpayers who are earning income from selling goods and/or providing services that they may receive Form 1099-K, Payment Card and Third-Party Network Transactions, for payment card transactions and third-party payment network transactions of more than $600 for the year.


Many taxpayers may be surprised in early 2023 when they receive a Form 1099-K, Payment Card and Third-Party Network Transactions, to report income earned in the “gig economy” or in sales of goods and services through certain internet sites. The number of taxpayers receiving the forms is expected to skyrocket because the threshold for reporting payments made through third-party processors has plummeted.


Beginning with their 2021 tax years, partnerships with "items of international tax relevance" must file Schedule K-2, Partners’ Distributive Share Items—International, and Schedule K-3, Partner’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc.—International.


The Tax Court set aside Notice 2017-10, 2017-4 I.R.B. 544, while adjudicating a series of consolidated cases involving limited liability companies (LLCs) and conservation easements, because it was improperly issued by the IRS without meeting the notice and comment requirements under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).


The Department of the Treasury outlined how the Inflation Reduction Act’s tax incentives will support the building of an equitable clean energy economy.


The IRS-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI) has released its Fiscal Year 2022 Annual Report. The report details statistics, important partnerships and significant criminal enforcement actions from IRS-CI, the criminal investigative arm of the IRS, for the past fiscal year, which began October 1, 2021 and ended September 30, 2022. Over 2,550 criminal investigations, the identification of more than $31 billion from tax fraud and financial crimes, and a 90.6 percent conviction rate are just a few highlights of the report.


Changes made by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 ( P.L. 117-169) are reflected in draft forms and instructions


The Internal Revenue Service is estimating the tax gap on tax years 2014-2016 to be $496 billion, an increase of more than $58 billion from the prior estimate.


Former Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Charles Rettig used his farewell message to highlight the work the agency’s workforce did during his four-year term as commissioner, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, but also during more normal times.


President Biden, on August 16, 2022, signed the Inflation Reduction Act ( P.L. 117-169) into law following its passage along party lines in both chambers of Congress.


The IRS began its "Dirty Dozen" list for 2022, which includes potentially abusive arrangements that taxpayers should avoid. The tax scams in this series focus on four transactions that are wrongfully promoted and will likely attract additional agency compliance efforts in the future. Those four abusive transactions involve charitable remainder annuity trusts, Maltese individual retirement arrangements, foreign captive insurance and monetized installment sales. These are the first four entries in this year’s Dirty Dozen series.


With the April 15th filing season deadline now behind us, it’s not too early to turn your attention to next year’s deadline for filing your 2014 return. That refocus requires among other things an awareness of the direct impact that many "ordinary," as well as one-time, transactions and events will have on the tax you will eventually be obligated to pay April 15, 2015. To gain this forward-looking perspective, however, taking a moment to look back … at the filing season that has just ended, is particularly worthwhile. This generally involves a two-step process: (1) a look-back at your 2013 tax return to pinpoint new opportunities as well as "lessons learned;" and (2) a look-back at what has happened in the tax world since January 1st that may indicate new challenges to be faced for the first time on your 2014 return.

Code Sec. 162 permits a business to deduct its ordinary and necessary expenses for carrying on the business. However, Code Sec. 274 restricts the deduction of entertainment expenses incurred for business by disallowing expenses of entertainment activities and entertainment facilities. Many expenses are totally disallowed; other amounts, if allowed under Code Sec. 274, are limited to 50 percent of the expense.




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